Who Will Be Affected by China’s Trade War?

After sitting on the cusp of a financial war with China, the U.S.A. has finally unleashed their tariffs on Chinese goods after accusing them of stealing intellectual property in March. This back-and-forth disrepute of imposing tariffs on certain items will have a backlash on the citizens of both countries as China seek to reprimand the U.S. The Chinese have since stated has since stated that although they did not start this conflict, they will fight back.

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Chinese technology is receiving a 25% tariff due to accusations by the Trump administration that the Chinese stole intellectual property which optimizes semi-conductor chips. These chips are found in most electronics, ranging from televisions, personal computers, iPhones, and cars. Unfortunately, it seems that the U.S. consumer will most likely be footing the bill as China’s production pricing will remain the same, but the cost to American citizens will increase by 25%, and the Chinese will not be covering these expenses.

China will not take a hit to its economy lightly and have already planned their retaliation by focusing their own tariffs on a wide variety of U.S. exports. This ranges from plastics, to nuclear reactors, to even dairy making equipment. China must be vigilant and handle these tariffs sensibly as Chinese brokerages are sitting on more than £240 billion of loans that grow riskier by the day as China’s equity market tumbles. Losses on the debt could wipe out 11pc of the industry’s net capital, the U.S. bank reported in July; and we suspect this is something U.S. Administration is aware of.

The reality could be more than fist wagging as this tariff war is the biggest economic attack in history. Although undoubtedly better than boots on the ground, this conflict still poses a threat to Americans and Chinese citizens. Firstly, American citizens have a lot to lose beginning with the aforementioned 25% tax they are going to need to pay on certain goods. Further issues include a shrinking market from Chinese buyers, and even rotting livestock due to smaller demand which will heavily affect farmers in the red Mid-West as they lose access to China’s market and are left with excess goods.

It seems likely that the war will not take place in the open, and the real battle will be “on the flanks in the form of unnecessary inspections, product quarantines, and heightened regulatory scrutiny” says James Zimmerman, a partner in the Beijing Office of International Law.

But in reality, this war affects everyone across the globe. With reduced access to the U.S. market, China’s growth may come to a halt which would have a knock-on effect to all world economies. Increased caution and confidence for business will cause uncertainty within China’s market and puts expansion plans on ice. With the two biggest economies grinding themselves against each other, could there be space for a third party to intervene?

Italy’s Harlequin Performance

The laughable situation in Italy in which the traditional political parties struggle for majority votes at the behest of the populist movement “5 Star” (MS5) is somewhat remnant of the Renaissance theatre style commedia dell’arte. MS5, the ambiguous and enigmatic harlequin-esque populist movement, has danced its way into mainstream politics taking a large slice of votes from the Right-Wing parties, who are now screaming “encore” as they attempt to scramble enough power to encourage a second election. But why have these events had a tumultuous effect on the rest of the world?

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The political drama began when the MS5 seized power through their refusal to bow down to political elites. This is not the typical Left vs. Right epidemic we see in most Western countries, but more of a working class vs. elite struggle like the Catalonians against Franco or British Labour reforms in the 60s. At this stage, MS5’s aim seems drastic – this is not just about a reform, this is about a revolution with a focus on domestic empowerment, immigration issues and the European Union alongside a strong hatred of the mafia. But nothing is set in stone, and due to this, Italy are currently proving real tricksters to label which is a massive turn-off for international investors.

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Geo-political issues and rapid social change tend to not bolster share prices, and since the beginning of this new chapter, Italy’s stocks have gone on sale. Rocky prices like we have seen it Italy do however tend to draw in the braver investors who hedge their bets on the dangerous side. Unfortunately, the sale prices don’t match the level of volatility in political stability, and therefore don’t seem to be a great bargain. This of course puts off even the high-risk investors. JP Morgan strategist Mislav Matejka noted recently that there is a poor risk-reward going forward giving the strong run and the political overhang.” It seems that nearby German equities have been the preferred route for most investors after taking profits on Italian stocks.

This mass sell-off of Italian stocks was originally triggered by fears of a second election and investors fear of Italy ditching the Euro, which currently seems highly likely. Investors have decided to keep their money in their pockets for now until the situation cools down with SocGen trio warning that buying could remain weak for several months.

Italy’s performance hasn’t just affected Europe, it managed to dance its way across to the Atlantic and cause the Dow Jones Industrial Average to drop 391 points. Although the Dow Jones made a huge recovery, making back most of the May dip, it is still undeniable that Italy’s Euroscepticism and quick social change managed to scare even the Americans.

No one can predict the ending of this drama, and although for now it seems that Italy have put forward a government, we don’t know if we are at the beginning or end of this unbridled saga which will likely continue to tighten the strings on investors’ wallets.

 

Is It Finally Euro-Russian Economic Armageddon?

Russia’s economy is heavily reliant on the European Union (EU). Over the last six years, we have seen a decline in trade relationships between the neighbours with EU investment falling by heights of as much as 44pc in 2014. Could the recent alleged Russian chemical attack in Salisbury, Britain hammer the final nail in to the coffin of an already dying economic relationship?

The EU/Russia trade relationship is based on the price of oil. Here’s why: The EU market’s relationship with Russia is dependent on the growth of the Russian economy, but this growth is intrinsically linked to oil prices. If this commodity does badly, then Russia does badly. Since 2011, and most significantly 2012-2016, the price of oil began to a steady decline – which is correlated to the weakened financial partnership between the EU and Russia. This was seen most notably at the end of 2015, when hydrocarbon exports were down 42pc from 2012. This subsequently leaves Russia in a weakened financial position – they could not burden further blows and remain buoyant in their current economic situation.

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But the Salisbury attack could be the last straw. Western states have already begun an exodus of Russian politicians from their embassies which worsens Russia’s geo-political influence worldwide.  So far, this has had no impact on the EU/Russia trade deal. Yet, if these sanctions begin to affect trade relations, Russia’s economy could find itself on life support as it stumbles toward a nadir. Its economy is already being pressurised by the decline in oil price, and a dwindling relationship with the EU – trade sanctions would leave the Russian economy in a hopeless situation, seeking alternative solutions.

It seems Russia is  aware of this and have begun reaching out to alternative markets to keep their economy afloat. In difficult circumstances Russia has reached out to Turkey, a nation who has been trying to gain access to the EU for years but has been rejected for a myriad of reasons – most notably their poor human rights record. Earlier this month, Putin joined President Erdogan at a ceremony for a Russian made Nuclear Power Plant. This isn’t the first sign of a romance brewing between the two nation states. Over Christmas they finalized an agreement that Turkey would purchase their S-400 Missile Defence System. Aside from this, they are building the Turkstream pipeline to transfer Russian gas to Turkey. Will Russia need the EU if relationships blossom with alternative markets? They have reached out to Turkey, but could this become a patterned behaviour?

DISCLAIMER: This message is provided for informational purposes and should not be construed as a solicitation or offer to buy or sell any securities. Past investment performance may not be indicative of future investment performance.