Just What Is Happening with Brexit?

Since the Brexit vote of 2016, British politics has been tumultuous with inter- and intraparty disagreements causing investors to treat FTSE and UK market investments as high-risk. So far, the most damaging aspect of Brexit seems to be uncertainty. Beyond the ramifications of leaving the EU, analysts are struggling to predict what a post-Brexit Britain will be like. It is difficult to predict how red tape around the Customs Union, which greatly benefits the British economy, will affect British trade, market capitalisation, and deciphering whether the market is undervalued or not.

The constant battles and disputes surrounding the legitimacy of Brexit and how Britain should go about it are frequently voiced in the House of Commons, appropriately reflecting the nations division over Brexit. Despite disunion being apparent between the two main British parties, Conservatives pushing for Brexit and Labour for a second referendum, there is a glaring divide notable within the Labour party – the left-wing alternative in the British parliamentary system.

Although individual Members of the Labour Shadow Government Parliament are for the most part Remainers, the party is a life-long Eurosceptic which is an obvious conflict of interest. Voters are very aware of this, and it is making Labour’s position on Brexit unappealing and creates more confusion among the electorate. Ex-British Labour Prime Minister Tony Blair has come out of the woodwork and criticised the current shadow government leader Jeremy Corbyn’s policies as being “the worst of both worlds”.

Following from this glaring division, an unforeseen issue has arisen in Ireland as talks of a hard border are discussed. Northern Ireland will follow Britain out of the EU, but Ireland will not. This issue was made more prominent when Theresa May stated recently that Britain is leaving the EU and will not softly exit the customs union.

This debate could reopen a healing wound with Northern Ireland by raising the issues of borders between the Ireland and Northern Ireland causing more political instability. Four political parties have backed Northern Ireland staying in the single market – stating that there should be no hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland – and Ireland and the rest of the UK. This is also being supported by the DUP who propped Theresa May into power during the last election.

These political conditions reflect peoples’ uncertainty as to what will happen. Since the referendum, there have been market crashes, volatility, and stagnation in house prices all related to the vote.

Theresa May has opened the Conservative sails to the wind with her firm Leave stance when addressing the EU last week, stating that Britain will not be “climbing down” and will leave the Customs Union. Hopefully, Britain will decide soon how it will tackle leaving the EU so that it can begin reshaping itself according as currently no one seems to know what is going on, making it tricky for investors to trust British markets.