Italy’s Harlequin Performance

The laughable situation in Italy in which the traditional political parties struggle for majority votes at the behest of the populist movement “5 Star” (MS5) is somewhat remnant of the Renaissance theatre style commedia dell’arte. MS5, the ambiguous and enigmatic harlequin-esque populist movement, has danced its way into mainstream politics taking a large slice of votes from the Right-Wing parties, who are now screaming “encore” as they attempt to scramble enough power to encourage a second election. But why have these events had a tumultuous effect on the rest of the world?

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The political drama began when the MS5 seized power through their refusal to bow down to political elites. This is not the typical Left vs. Right epidemic we see in most Western countries, but more of a working class vs. elite struggle like the Catalonians against Franco or British Labour reforms in the 60s. At this stage, MS5’s aim seems drastic – this is not just about a reform, this is about a revolution with a focus on domestic empowerment, immigration issues and the European Union alongside a strong hatred of the mafia. But nothing is set in stone, and due to this, Italy are currently proving real tricksters to label which is a massive turn-off for international investors.

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Geo-political issues and rapid social change tend to not bolster share prices, and since the beginning of this new chapter, Italy’s stocks have gone on sale. Rocky prices like we have seen it Italy do however tend to draw in the braver investors who hedge their bets on the dangerous side. Unfortunately, the sale prices don’t match the level of volatility in political stability, and therefore don’t seem to be a great bargain. This of course puts off even the high-risk investors. JP Morgan strategist Mislav Matejka noted recently that there is a poor risk-reward going forward giving the strong run and the political overhang.” It seems that nearby German equities have been the preferred route for most investors after taking profits on Italian stocks.

This mass sell-off of Italian stocks was originally triggered by fears of a second election and investors fear of Italy ditching the Euro, which currently seems highly likely. Investors have decided to keep their money in their pockets for now until the situation cools down with SocGen trio warning that buying could remain weak for several months.

Italy’s performance hasn’t just affected Europe, it managed to dance its way across to the Atlantic and cause the Dow Jones Industrial Average to drop 391 points. Although the Dow Jones made a huge recovery, making back most of the May dip, it is still undeniable that Italy’s Euroscepticism and quick social change managed to scare even the Americans.

No one can predict the ending of this drama, and although for now it seems that Italy have put forward a government, we don’t know if we are at the beginning or end of this unbridled saga which will likely continue to tighten the strings on investors’ wallets.