The Robotics Revolution

As research in the robotics sector continues to advance so does investment interest in it, as well as the switch from human contribution within a variety of sectors to the use of robots within the same roles. This has seen many companies benefit from the new technologies, through streamlining of processes with automation.

Baxter, a working robot © Plastiques Photography, courtesy of the Science Museum

In a recent deal Google has sold its advanced engineering and robotics unit, Boston Dynamics, to Japanese multinational company Softbank. The acquisition, which is believed to have been for around $100 million is just one of many recent acquisitions by Softbank, as part of its $100 billion tech investment “Vision Fund”. They have also recently taken over British chip designer, ARM Holdings for $32 billion, and office space start up WeWork for £300 million.

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Following the introduction of their dual-arm collective robot in 2015, Swiss industrial company ABB has experienced significant growth in interest, with their American depository receipts having gained 11% since March 2017. In fact, many robotic stocks have remained attractive to long-term investors, with German robotics company Kuka up 9% and Rockwell Automation, an American industrial automation company, up 7% since March 2017. The fear with the rapid growth of this industry is that many people may lost their jobs as companies choose to automate more and more of their processes. However, Jeff Immelt, CEO of General Electric, believes that, at least in the first part of the revolution, robots will actually help to make existing workers more efficient in their roles, rather than replacing them.

While this may be the case in some companies, in others the threat of replacement by robots is more immediate. Following Amazon’s $13.7 million deal to acquire Whole Foods, founder and CEO Jeff Bezos plans to automate the warehouses of both companies with a new fleet of robots, aimed at streamlining the distribution process. This could potentially put thousands of employees out of work in America, as well as in Canada and the UK. However, currently, Amazon’s hiring rates have not been affected, with employee numbers up 43% on last year, with 351,000 employees at the end of March, and the full effect of bringing in new robots awaits to be seen.

Asimo at the Robots exhibition © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

The future of manual work within big industries remains uncertain, however, interest in the robotics industry seems set to continue growing. As new products are continuously developed their uses within various sectors will continue to expand.

(Please note: James O’Leary does not currently hold a position in Kuka, Rockwell Automation, Amazon, Whole Foods or Google. Henry James International does not currently own a position in Kuka, Rockwell Automation, Amazon, Whole Foods or Google, for any client portfolios).

(Please note: James O’Leary does currently hold a position in ABB, General Electric, Boston Dynamics, or Softbank. Henry James International does currently own a position in ABB, General Electric, Boston Dynamics, or Softbank for any client portfolios).